techcrunch:

Drone flying lesson with @photojojo in Dolores Park! #TCTV

techcrunch:

Drone flying lesson with @photojojo in Dolores Park! #TCTV

techcrunch Via: TechCrunch
Filed under: Tabs I keep open in my browser. Source

Filed under: Tabs I keep open in my browser. Source

My bike!

Spotted in St Helena a few weeks ago by ryangraves.

My bike!

Spotted in St Helena a few weeks ago by ryangraves.

naveen:

Wait, WUT?
Every so often, when I am sitting alone with my phone (sad panda) and have some time to kill, I log into the anonymous internet: usually WUT and Secret.
After spending most of the last decade on services that need your actual identity, I’ve been curious about these services that allow you to leave your real names behind. I think the late 90s were the last time I personally sought out services where I was anonymous or pseudonymous. Ever since then, I’ve been bringing together my identity into one namespace (@naveen).
One of the immediate benefits in such services is that your words carry weight and legitimacy on their own. You don’t scan to see who posted it before deciding whether to start reading it. Twitter democratized things in the sense that I could post something in the same space (and potential audience) as someone else, but if he started with more followers or a bigger brand than me, you would pay attention to and retweet his post way more than mine (rich get richer). With these anonymous services, none of that matters – your words are the only thing that’s important and they carry themselves.
Sometimes, you can use these services just to have a public conversation of your thoughts. Perhaps these are like the things you mutter to yourself in an empty room when you know no one else is listening. It could be frustration; things you say out loud that you don’t even realize you are saying out loud; future conversation you’re rolling around in your head; &c. (Oh god, I can’t believe I just admitted that here like a crazy person, but come on, surely others do this too.) I find that the majority of posts on both services are of this nature: things that would otherwise probably have never been captured.
In the handful of times I’ve used Secret, I found I only posted things in order to maximize likes. That addictive dopamine behavior that I like so much on other social services had made its way here as well. It didn’t matter that no one would know on Secret that I was the author, but just knowing that whatever I posted was clever or funny (and other people thought so) got me to post even more things. Why do we create publicly anyway if not to be validated? I wonder if others think the same way. Further, I wonder if others post things just to be provocative and to get hearts. If so, the things you’re posting on Secret then don’t mean the same thing as an honest message, and in some ways takes away from the authenticity. (I’ve noticed incredibly funny people on Twitter tend to do this too: make up stories or anecdotes about someone they saw on the street but it just so happens not to be true. Perhaps it’s the standup comic way of telling a story.)
WUT doesn’t have that problem. Because no one can give you the same kind of feedback, beyond just responding to your message with another linearly, you can’t game the system for such events. Even if you post with the intention of getting a response, there’s no interface to show you and others watching “XX post of yours had NN hearts” (or whatever).
Sometimes, WUT turns into a weird game of telephone. This is especially true of this service over others in its class because there are no threads in WUT: no distinction between posts and comments. Someone will say something, and others will take it and turn it into some rhyme or repeated pattern.
I recently moved WUT up higher in the notifications drawer on iOS. It now sits immediately after Phone and Messages. I thought this was very curious as I’ve never consciously done this for any application ever (even ones I am coding up and testing). I thought about this for a while, and then realized I had to do this: WUT’s primary interface is not in the app, it’s in the Notifications drawer. I think that’s the first time I’ve ever had any app on my phone that used this view space in that way.
WUT messages remind me of early Twitter. In 2006 Twitter, we would post whatever and whenever, free of a filter. It was weird: even though all these posts were public and indexable by the internet, we posted as if only our forty-five followers were ever listening. As we’ve gotten older and more people are listening, we have all come to filter ourselves and to start “creating brands around our identity.”
In more than a few cases, WUT has also become early foursquare: “Sun’s out; in Washington square park. Who’s around?”
Anyway, those are some things I think of when I’m fooling around with these services.
Beyond these explorations, I don’t know what to make of these apps. What more can I do with them? How long will the messages be new and exciting and not the same old stuff over and over again? If it’s the same old, I’m likely to just stop using and I think I am getting close. They’re like games in that way: interesting only when they have your attention and, right now, they have my attention.

naveen:

Wait, WUT?

Every so often, when I am sitting alone with my phone (sad panda) and have some time to kill, I log into the anonymous internet: usually WUT and Secret.

After spending most of the last decade on services that need your actual identity, I’ve been curious about these services that allow you to leave your real names behind. I think the late 90s were the last time I personally sought out services where I was anonymous or pseudonymous. Ever since then, I’ve been bringing together my identity into one namespace (@naveen).

One of the immediate benefits in such services is that your words carry weight and legitimacy on their own. You don’t scan to see who posted it before deciding whether to start reading it. Twitter democratized things in the sense that I could post something in the same space (and potential audience) as someone else, but if he started with more followers or a bigger brand than me, you would pay attention to and retweet his post way more than mine (rich get richer). With these anonymous services, none of that matters – your words are the only thing that’s important and they carry themselves.

Sometimes, you can use these services just to have a public conversation of your thoughts. Perhaps these are like the things you mutter to yourself in an empty room when you know no one else is listening. It could be frustration; things you say out loud that you don’t even realize you are saying out loud; future conversation you’re rolling around in your head; &c. (Oh god, I can’t believe I just admitted that here like a crazy person, but come on, surely others do this too.) I find that the majority of posts on both services are of this nature: things that would otherwise probably have never been captured.

In the handful of times I’ve used Secret, I found I only posted things in order to maximize likes. That addictive dopamine behavior that I like so much on other social services had made its way here as well. It didn’t matter that no one would know on Secret that I was the author, but just knowing that whatever I posted was clever or funny (and other people thought so) got me to post even more things. Why do we create publicly anyway if not to be validated? I wonder if others think the same way. Further, I wonder if others post things just to be provocative and to get hearts. If so, the things you’re posting on Secret then don’t mean the same thing as an honest message, and in some ways takes away from the authenticity. (I’ve noticed incredibly funny people on Twitter tend to do this too: make up stories or anecdotes about someone they saw on the street but it just so happens not to be true. Perhaps it’s the standup comic way of telling a story.)

WUT doesn’t have that problem. Because no one can give you the same kind of feedback, beyond just responding to your message with another linearly, you can’t game the system for such events. Even if you post with the intention of getting a response, there’s no interface to show you and others watching “XX post of yours had NN hearts” (or whatever).

Sometimes, WUT turns into a weird game of telephone. This is especially true of this service over others in its class because there are no threads in WUT: no distinction between posts and comments. Someone will say something, and others will take it and turn it into some rhyme or repeated pattern.

I recently moved WUT up higher in the notifications drawer on iOS. It now sits immediately after Phone and Messages. I thought this was very curious as I’ve never consciously done this for any application ever (even ones I am coding up and testing). I thought about this for a while, and then realized I had to do this: WUT’s primary interface is not in the app, it’s in the Notifications drawer. I think that’s the first time I’ve ever had any app on my phone that used this view space in that way.

WUT messages remind me of early Twitter. In 2006 Twitter, we would post whatever and whenever, free of a filter. It was weird: even though all these posts were public and indexable by the internet, we posted as if only our forty-five followers were ever listening. As we’ve gotten older and more people are listening, we have all come to filter ourselves and to start “creating brands around our identity.”

In more than a few cases, WUT has also become early foursquare: “Sun’s out; in Washington square park. Who’s around?”

Anyway, those are some things I think of when I’m fooling around with these services.

Beyond these explorations, I don’t know what to make of these apps. What more can I do with them? How long will the messages be new and exciting and not the same old stuff over and over again? If it’s the same old, I’m likely to just stop using and I think I am getting close. They’re like games in that way: interesting only when they have your attention and, right now, they have my attention.

naveen Via:

photojojo:

The Top 5 High Fives of National High Five Day … So far!

1. Fancy Five!

2. Family Five!

3. Side Five!

4. Running Start Five!

5. Sigh Five.

Show us your High Five skillz at HighFiveTheInternet.com

photojojo:

Happy National High Five Day! 
We made a little something called highfivetheinternet.com so the whole world can create gifs of and share their highest of fives.
Take a five, leave a five.
HighFiveTheInternet.com

High five the internet, friends. From your pals at Photojojo.
HighFiveTheInternet.com

photojojo:

Happy National High Five Day!

We made a little something called highfivetheinternet.com so the whole world can create gifs of and share their highest of fives.

Take a five, leave a five.

HighFiveTheInternet.com

High five the internet, friends. From your pals at Photojojo.

HighFiveTheInternet.com

lonelysandwich:

Ergo dronies

If Kottke says it’s a thing, it must be a thing. As consumer camera drones become more common, this kind of shot (or the one that inspired it by Amit Gupta) will become more familiar. Or this one I made with ominous shadow and a bit of vignette for enhanced drama.

There’s a reason that you’re going to see a lot of these from drone flyers like me, and it’s this: once you get past the novelty of taking a camera high up in the air, getting a bird’s eye view of stuff is actually a little boring.

What birds see is actually a little boring. Humans are interesting. Getting close to stuff is interesting. I bet if we could strap tiny cameras to bird heads, most of what we’d want to look at would happen when they fly close to people. If we could, we’d put cameras on bird heads to take pictures of ourselves.

But try flying your drone close to people. They get freaked out (trust me). Ergo dronies. You want to shoot people, you have to shoot the people you have access to. You end up shooting yourself. It’s not vain, it’s pragmatic.

The next part of the story is the fun part: discovering new things to do with it. New ways to shoot, new shots to get, new moves and new angles. What this feels like to me is that photography was just introduced and enthusiasts are figuring out what a wide shot is and how it feels different from a closeup. Or like the Steadicam was just invented and people are figuring out that running it down a narrow hallway looks really fucking cool.

This doesn’t happen very often, that we find new ways to see ourselves.

Took a selfie with zachklein and nickbilton and all the dogs this weekend.

photojojo:

No more power cable spaghetti!
The Cordito keeps all your cords together and tangle free in a nifty leather wrap. 
Keep all your phoneography accessories safe and stylish
*Guacamole not included.

Been using this for the past couple months and LOVE it.

photojojo:

No more power cable spaghetti!

The Cordito keeps all your cords together and tangle free in a nifty leather wrap.

Keep all your phoneography accessories safe and stylish

*Guacamole not included.

Been using this for the past couple months and LOVE it.

photojojo:

Our pals at Double Robotics let us borrow a robot so Drew could join us on a photo adventure, without traveling all the way from Texas!

He rolled around the Golden Gate with us, posed for a group pic and even got to show his kids that neat bridge.

The future is cool.

506,863 Plays

petervidani:

For your convenience, a reading of today’s Staff Blog post.

The smile of a loved one. Your childhood blanket. A handsome bodyguard to take you in his arms. “Security” can mean a lot of things in this crazy life, but nothing says “security” like Tumblr’s two-factor authentication. It’s available as an option in your Settings page as of right now.

You know how you need two keys to launch a nuclear missile? Two-factor authentication works like that. One key is your password, the other key is your cellular phone, and you need both to access your Tumblr Dashboard.

Keep your Dashboard safe and secure, like you do with your nuclear missile. Learn more about two-factor authentication today.

BEST BLOG POST EVER WRITTEN (AND SPOKEN) ABOUT TWO-FACTOR AUTH. HIGH-FIVE TO THE AUTHOR, WHOEVER YOU ARE.

Aerial Selfie, Take 2.
(Mt Tam, California)

Tagged as: aerial drone mt. tam
Brandie caught a photo of me taking photos with the quadcopter (aka “drone”) up on Mt. Tam this weekend.

Brandie caught a photo of me taking photos with the quadcopter (aka “drone”) up on Mt. Tam this weekend.

Washington’s antibusiness prohibition of drones is reminiscent of the beginnings of the Internet. For years, commercial use was a crime.

A handbook issued at MIT in 1982 warned: “It is considered illegal to use the ARPAnet for anything which is not in direct support of government business…

Sending electronic mail over the ARPAnet for commercial profit or political purposes is both anti-social and illegal…”

Playing around with some scans from the Nishika camera. I took these back when Leah Gupta was a babe.

Playing around with some scans from the Nishika camera. I took these back when Leah Gupta was a babe.

Tagged as: 3D nishika
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